Help for students who need it

There’s an increasing number of children in Scotland who are unable to read or write well. This affects many aspects of their lives including their academic attainment, behaviour and future success. 

In a survey of 10,100 pupils and 4,600 teachers in the 2,250 schools across Scotland, the 2016 Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy found that the difference in literacy attainment levels between pupils from the most and least deprived areas in Scotland is as much as 18%.
difference in literacy attainment levels between pupils from the most and least deprived areas in Scotland is as much as 18 percent

 

poor literacy

In order to fully address the attainment gap in Scotland, schools and authorities also need to address low literacy levels. Low literacy will have an effect on every area of a child’s education, as well as impact upon opportunities in later life.

Spotting the signs of poor literacy in a large classroom or even across an Education Authority is no easy task. And with increasing numbers of students in each class, it’s important to spot the signs of struggling readers and writers at an early stage so that appropriate interventions can be made.

We teamed up with Target Literacy Director, Christine Cork, to produce this handy guide for spotting the signs of students with literacy difficulties as well as some easy-to-implement interventions.

Inequality in school

 

Tackling inequity in Scottish Education is at the very top of the Scottish Government’s agenda and the newly established Scottish Attainment Challenge aims to raise the attainment of children and young people living in deprived areas, in order to close the equity gap. It will drive forward improvements in educational outcomes to ensure that everyone is encouraged to be the best they can be. 

Equity in education means that personal or social circumstances such as gender, ethnic origin or family background, shouldn’t be obstacles to achieving individual educational potential.